Total Eyecare Under One Roof.

88 Yearsof Eye Care in Gujarat India.

Care With Compassion

Pioneer of Phako Emulsification Surgery in India (Since 1987).

Diva eye institute is gujarat's No 1 eye hospital which has been awarded with NABH (National accreditation Board of Hospitals)

Faq's

The Diva Eye institute has behind it a robust history of eighty years of eye care in the state of Gujarat.

FAQ for Glaucoma.

Glaucoma is the term used to describe a number of related conditions that cause damage to the optic nerve, which transmits information from the eye to the brain. It usually (but not always) is associated with high intraocular pressure (IOP). Left untreated, glaucoma can cause blindness.
Ocular hypertension is another term for high eye pressure. In ocular hypertension, IOP is higher than normal but does not cause optic nerve damage and vision loss. Ocular hypertension is a risk factor for glaucoma and should be monitored closely
If you're over age 60, African-American, diabetic or have a family member with glaucoma, you are at higher risk for glaucoma than others.
There is nothing that will prevent glaucoma, but you can slow down its development with early treatment. Therefore, it is very important that you have regular eye exams. Your doctor will perform a series of painless tests -- eye pressure measurements, dilated eye exams, and sometimes visual field testing -- to check for any changes in your eye or in your vision. With early detection, glaucoma can often be controlled with medications, either eye drops or pills. If your glaucoma doesn't respond to medication, your doctor may also recommend surgery. Remember, about half of people with glaucoma don't know they have it, and doctors cannot reverse damage from glaucoma. Vision lost is irreversible; you can't get your vision back once it is lost. Your best protection is to get regular eye exams, every couple of years if you are over 40 or on a schedule recommended by your doctor.
Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of glaucoma. The other types are: normal-tension, narrow-angle, closed-angle, congenital, pigmentary and secondary.
Your eye doctor can perform a series of simple testes which will help to determine whether you have glaucoma or likely to develop the disease even before you have any symptoms.

Consult eye doctor immediately if you develop painful red eyes with blurred vision.
There are usually no signs that you're developing glaucoma until vision loss occurs, which is why it's so important to have regular eye exams. Your eye doctor can detect and treat high IOP before it progresses to optic nerve damage and vision loss.
The chances are good that you will not go blind if you take your medication correctly and regularly and follow up with your doctor. Treatment significantly slows the damage that occurs to the optic nerve because of the high pressure in the eye. In fact, if you take your eye drops on schedule each day, you'll probably keep your eyesight until the day you die of old age!
Not necessarily, but it does increase your risk. Other factors that may increase your risk are:

  • Being over age 50
  • Being over age 40 and African-American
  • Having a family history of glaucoma
  • Having a history of serious eye injury
  • Taking steroid medications
  • Having diabetes
  • Being nearsighted
  • Having high blood pressure
People with these risk factors should have their eyes examined on a regular basis to look for the disease.
The "puff test" that most people are familiar with is a screening test that measures IOP. But the gold standard for measuring eye pressure is applanation Tonometry. In this glaucoma test, an eye drop is used to numb the surface of your eye and a small probe rests gently on your cornea to measure IOP.

Your doctor may also want to check for optic nerve damage by dilating your eyes, or to check for vision loss with a visual field test.
Vision loss from glaucoma cannot be reversed. Routine eye exams are essential to discover glaucoma early and begin glaucoma treatment before significant vision loss has occurred.
Yes. There are many different types of medications (in eye drops or pills) that are used to treat glaucoma. Typically, the doctor will start you on an eye drop formula. The medications work two ways: Some decrease how much fluid is produced in the eye; others help the fluid flow out better. Many people can preserve their vision if they take their medications as scheduled and visit their doctor regularly. Note: Medications for glaucoma -- even eye drops -- can affect the entire body, so you should alert all of your doctors that you are taking them.

In some people, however, drugs alone do not control the eye pressure, and surgery is needed. One type of surgery called laser trabeculoplasty uses a laser to improve the flow of fluids out of the eye. This can be done in your doctor's office. There are also several conventional surgeries -- the most common is called trabeculectomy -- in which your doctor creates a new drainage path in the eye under the eyelid. This surgery must be done in an operating room. After both of these procedures, people may still have to take eye drops to further lower the eye pressure.